Re: Your Photography

Postby wuffy on Thu 2/Jun/11 9:34pm

Tried my hand at light-painting. This is just with a spot-light torch. Almost looks like a studio style shot if it weren't for the highlights in some areas that look a bit overexposed.

Pretty pleased with it actually.

Image
wuffy
Member for: 13 years 7 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby Conners on Thu 2/Jun/11 9:47pm

You bought Robbie's old chain?


Nice shot oi ;)
Conners
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Member for: 19 years 5 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby EoinC on Thu 2/Jun/11 9:54pm

kona.stinky. wrote:...Constructive criticism would be greatly appreciated...
Good job, KS. Had you grown up in the age of film, handheld exposure meters, and bracketing, you would know that sometimes you have to take 5 shots of a set-up just to get an exposure close to your cerebral snapshot, and then do a lot of dodging and burning to get the print where it should be. In the digital age, don't be shy about firing off plenty to try to capture one good one, but make sure you understand what you're trying to achieve, and why the dropped shots are dropped shots (rather than just hoping for a random good one).

For what you are trying to achieve, manual focus will give you greater consistency than auto focus - It's up to you whether that means consistently good, or consistently crap. You can do this by either manually pulling the focus (ie focusing on something that is exactly the same distance from the camera's 'film' plane, or by doing it by the numbers. If you look on your lens, you will probably see a bunch of little painted lines and numbers (see attached image). These indicate the distance ranges that are in focus for a given aperture setting. As the aperture gets smaller (Nº gets bigger), the range of distances that are in focus (depth of field) gets larger. The symbol means infinity, so if it is within the range markers for the aperture that you're using, everything from the lower end marker to infinity will be in focus. Equally, you can use the range to ensure something is out of focus.
Having everything in focus works well for some photo's (Ansel Adams' landscapes etc), but in others it can make the photo appear flat or distracting. Try to figure out what you want to achieve before you take the photo, and then use the aperture, shutter speed, and 'film speed' (sensitivity) to get you in the place you wanna be.
EoinC
Member for: 12 years 3 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby wuffy on Thu 2/Jun/11 9:57pm

EoinC wrote:Ansel Adams


:love:
wuffy
Member for: 13 years 7 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby EoinC on Thu 2/Jun/11 9:59pm

wuffy wrote:
EoinC wrote:Ansel Adams


:love:

:withstupid:
EoinC
Member for: 12 years 3 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby kona.stinky. on Thu 2/Jun/11 10:17pm

EoinC wrote:
kona.stinky. wrote:...Constructive criticism would be greatly appreciated...
Good job, KS. Had you grown up in the age of film, handheld exposure meters, and bracketing, you would know that sometimes you have to take 5 shots of a set-up just to get an exposure close to your cerebral snapshot, and then do a lot of dodging and burning to get the print where it should be. In the digital age, don't be shy about firing off plenty to try to capture one good one, but make sure you understand what you're trying to achieve, and why the dropped shots are dropped shots (rather than just hoping for a random good one).

For what you are trying to achieve, manual focus will give you greater consistency than auto focus - It's up to you whether that means consistently good, or consistently crap. You can do this by either manually pulling the focus (ie focusing on something that is exactly the same distance from the camera's 'film' plane, or by doing it by the numbers. If you look on your lens, you will probably see a bunch of little painted lines and numbers (see attached image). These indicate the distance ranges that are in focus for a given aperture setting. As the aperture gets smaller (Nº gets bigger), the range of distances that are in focus (depth of field) gets larger. The symbol means infinity, so if it is within the range markers for the aperture that you're using, everything from the lower end marker to infinity will be in focus. Equally, you can use the range to ensure something is out of focus.
Having everything in focus works well for some photo's (Ansel Adams' landscapes etc), but in others it can make the photo appear flat or distracting. Try to figure out what you want to achieve before you take the photo, and then use the aperture, shutter speed, and 'film speed' (sensitivity) to get you in the place you wanna be.

Thanks man.
I'm going to go for another shoot tomorrow morning at Craters, so I will have more light to work worth, and more angles to work with. Should be fun .
kona.stinky.
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"Si"
Member for: 12 years 11 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby kona.stinky. on Thu 2/Jun/11 10:19pm

wuffy wrote:Tried my hand at light-painting. This is just with a spot-light torch. Almost looks like a studio style shot if it weren't for the highlights in some areas that look a bit overexposed.

Pretty pleased with it actually.

Image

Nice bike Wuffy ! You going to run it geared or single speed ?
kona.stinky.
User avatar
"Si"
Member for: 12 years 11 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby wuffy on Thu 2/Jun/11 11:36pm

SS for now, should be good fun :thumbsup:
wuffy
Member for: 13 years 7 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby Oli on Fri 3/Jun/11 12:29am

I like the perspective of this shot I took; Welli is so photogenic.
Wellington.jpg
Oli
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Member for: 17 years 4 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby Conners on Fri 3/Jun/11 8:29am

That's a nice set of Welly shots you've taken there Oli!
Ahhhhhh, Welly :love:
Conners
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Member for: 19 years 5 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby Conners on Fri 3/Jun/11 8:30am

Bump!

Conners wrote:Rookie question time from me:
I'm outputting some photos from lightroom for printing - not really sure on what settings I should be using:
1. jpeg/tiff?
2. "Sharpening for print"? (or not?)
3. No need to crank the dpi if it's only to be printed 5x7?

Any pointers appreciated :blush:
Conners
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"Seeing Double"
Member for: 19 years 5 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby kona.stinky. on Fri 3/Jun/11 8:23pm

Went for another shoot today.
As usual constructive criticism would be great.
:)

Image

Image

rest of the shots
kona.stinky.
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"Si"
Member for: 12 years 11 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby RJD on Fri 3/Jun/11 9:12pm

Conners wrote:Bump!

Conners wrote:Rookie question time from me:
I'm outputting some photos from lightroom for printing - not really sure on what settings I should be using:
1. jpeg/tiff?
2. "Sharpening for print"? (or not?)
3. No need to crank the dpi if it's only to be printed 5x7?

Any pointers appreciated :blush:


What do you mean by printing, you sending jpg somewher to print? Or printing yourself?
RJD
Member for: 14 years 7 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby Jono on Fri 3/Jun/11 10:01pm

I went out and took a bunch of photos at the wellington 12 hour race a couple of weeks back. It was really good practice for me (800 shots in all, lots of practice with remote flash (line of sight firing from the body)). There are some of the ones that I was more pleased with.

Event photography was interesting, because it seems to be more about finding a spot and shooting until something interesting happens, or lucking out with the light/setting sun in the trees. Or just waiting for ashley on her final run :)

wainui 6 hr (4 of 7).jpg


wainui 6 hr (6 of 7).jpg


wainui 6 hr (7 of 7).jpg


wainui 6 hr (1 of 1).jpg


wainui 6 hr (2 of 7).jpg
Jono
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Member for: 20 years 11 months

Re: Your Photography

Postby wolffman1 on Fri 3/Jun/11 10:47pm

RJD wrote:
Conners wrote:Bump!

Conners wrote:Rookie question time from me:
I'm outputting some photos from lightroom for printing - not really sure on what settings I should be using:
1. jpeg/tiff?
2. "Sharpening for print"? (or not?)
3. No need to crank the dpi if it's only to be printed 5x7?

Any pointers appreciated :blush:


What do you mean by printing, you sending jpg somewher to print? Or printing yourself?

I'm gonna assume that you are sending them out to a printer to save yourself the time and effort. I did a batch awhile ago and most of them came out fine, but there were a few that were dicey out of about 250 or so.
I set quality to 100, jpeg, print sharpen for glossy paper at high, and left the pixels per inch at 150, then forced the file size to less than 3mb. I only printed at 6x4 and most were fine, but a few were oversharpened. Next time, I think I will let the file size be unlimited and turn the sharpening down.
Stay out of prophoto RGB colour space as the printers won't get anywhere near it.

The place I took them to, printed a couple of tests for me before we printed the whole lot, so think about asking for that if its a really big job lot.
wolffman1
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"Maaangooo"
Member for: 14 years 2 months

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