Swedish Pirate Party Wins A Seat In The European Union!

Postby Trail on Mon 8/Jun/09 9:38am

The Swedish Pirate Party—Piratpartiet—has got a seat in the European Union parlament. The ballots are still being counted—almost done now—but with 7.1% of the votes, it's a sure thing. Aaaaaaaarrrrr is all I can say.

http://www.val.se/val/ep2009/valnatt/rike/index.html
tpb.jpg
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Re: Swedish Pirate Party Wins A Seat In The European Union!

Postby Tama on Mon 8/Jun/09 9:41am

Boy - those huge record companies sure showed those pesky pirates who's boss :huh:
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Re: Swedish Pirate Party Wins A Seat In The European Union!

Postby radiusq on Mon 8/Jun/09 9:43am

Slightly off topic, but what exactly does "Shiver me timbers" actually mean?

...and if I didn't know better I would suggest that the diebold voting machines got hacked :sly:
Last edited by radiusq on Mon 8/Jun/09 9:46am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Swedish Pirate Party Wins A Seat In The European Union!

Postby Tama on Mon 8/Jun/09 9:45am

radiusq wrote:Slightly off topic, but what exactly does "Shiver me timbers" actually mean?

:)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiver_me_timbers wrote:According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the expression "shiver my timbers" probably first appeared in a published work by Frederick Marryat called Jacob Faithful (1834). After an argument over grog, Tom's father has his wooden leg (a wooden leg was occasionally called a timber in slang) trapped between some bricks and is unable to move. Tom agrees to assist him on the condition he will not get a beating.

"I won’t thrash you, Tom. Shiver my timbers if I do."
"They're in a fair way of being shivered as it is, I think. Now, father, we're both even."

The expression is a derivative of actual 18th century nautical slang, when the phrase "timbers!" or "my timbers!" meant an exclamation (cf. "my goodness!") as can be seen in Poor Jack, a song from 1789 by Charles Dibdin. The opening phrase shiver my... also predates Jacob Faithful with the following lines from John O'Keeffe's 1791 comic play Wild Oats an earlier example:

Harry: I say it's false.
John : False! Shiver my hulk, Mr. Buckskin, if you wore a lion's skin I'd curry you for this.
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