Newbie Needs Help!

Postby nessie on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:12pm

Hi All,

I'm very new to cycling - bought a bike 12 weeks ago - and after having mastered the art of riding with clips I'm wanting to do an epic event. I'm keen on doing the Source to Sea and have been training at least 4 days a week for the 12 weeks. My longest ride to date is 80km. I have three children and a full time job so finding time can be a struggle.

My question is - am I dreaming about being able to complete the Source to Sea or should I stick to lazy lane cycling with the kids?

I have plenty of enthusiasm but am struggling with the mental aspect of it.

All responses gratefully received!
Nessie
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Postby psychavoc on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:19pm

Enthusiasm is great! :thumbsup: And if you've found time to get out and ride 4 times a week with three kids, then that's awesome! :)

Are you following any particular training programme or schedule? Something with a bit more structure could help you get the most out of your time on the bike :)
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Postby nessie on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:24pm

Thanks, I am riding to work during the school holidays so a round trip of about 45kms a day.

I printed off the Lake Taupo Challenge training schedule but to be honest its bloody hard!

I'm really loving the bike and I feel fantastic after a ride but I'm freaking out that Source to Sea is for 'real' riders not over enthusiastic new comers such as myself.
nessie
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Postby Tugboat on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:26pm

Any local bunch rides you can join to learn the ins and outs of bunch riding? Bunches make those longer rides more social and enjoyable and being able to hide out of the wind every now and then is always a bonus.
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Postby molotovd on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:27pm

Don't let anyone tell you that you cant. If you have your mind set to it, and you want to do it. Go for it! :thumbsup:

ps. practise makes perfect. everyone has been a learner rider at some stage. If you train hard, you will succeed.
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Postby Tugboat on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:30pm

nessie wrote:

I'm really loving the bike and I feel fantastic after a ride but I'm freaking out that Source to Sea is for 'real' riders not over enthusiastic new comers such as myself.


You'll find a real cross-section of abilities at any event like Source to Sea. I'm picking that if you're already riding 4 times a week and 45 - 80km at that - that you'll be able to do the distance. It'll hurt at times but that just makes finishing ever so more satisfying.
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Postby psychavoc on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:30pm

nessie wrote:I'm really loving the bike and I feel fantastic after a ride but I'm freaking out that Source to Sea is for 'real' riders not over enthusiastic new comers such as myself.

I've just had a look at last year's results. The winner finished in just over 4 hours, and the last group of riders finished around 8-8.5 hours. So it looks like there was a wide range of rider speeds/abilities/levels of fitness in there :thumbsup:
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Postby chchbob on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:34pm

Having justcompleted my first race/event I would say go for it, as there is real sense of achievment in crossing the finish line. I would agree though try and get in a little bunch riding before hand, and also try and do a 100km + ride in the next couple of weeks to make sure you can do the distance on the bike.

But with a bit of enthusium and training any thing is possible.
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Postby nessie on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:34pm

You guys are great! A little bit of encouragement goes a long way.

I'm battling daily "its a long way/impossible/huge hills/you're dreaming" comments from well meaning bystanders.

My aim is to go the distance, next year my aim will be to make a certain time.

Thanks again.
nessie
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Postby psychavoc on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:43pm

It's always good to have races/events to aim for :thumbsup:

This year, I entered a 6 hour mountainbiking race and the main idea was to see if I could just keep pedalling the whole time (longest I'd done on the bike before that was 4 hours), and it HURT at the time and every now and again I thought "why am I doing this?!", but the feeling of satisfaction at the end was just awesome :)
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Postby chchbob on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:47pm

nessie wrote:
I'm battling daily "its a long way/impossible/huge hills/you're dreaming" comments from well meaning bystanders.


I was told it was down hill ... :D

nessie wrote:
My aim is to go the distance, next year my aim will be to make a certain time.


Great way to approach it, get it done first then aim to do it faster.. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
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Postby nzmatto on Mon 6/Oct/08 3:59pm

I am in a similar stage to you. I brought my bike (first one in 20 years) in may, and have the goal of doing Taupo next year. I find training hard, but I have set myself lots of little goals to achieve on the way, and so slowly I am ticking them off. I have also set a schedule of doing at least one long ride per month, each month going 10km further. If I stick to this then by the time Taupo comes around next year I will have completed a 180km ride in October 09.
I live on the hills in Wellington so training for hills is about as easy as walking out the front door.
to date the longest ride I have done is 80km which is well ahead of what my training schedule suggests, and next weekend I plan to do 100km in the tour of Waikanae. It is all about doing the distance this time, not about the time, and the Waikanae ride is really really easy. I did 2 x 25km laps this morning!!!

Anyway, there are lots and lots of people out there who will say it cant be done, even more who will say your stupid for trying, and those are all the sorts of people who just sit around and watch others achieve things! Blow them off by challenging them to get off the butt and do something.
Remember, You CAN do it. It may hurt, it may cost a couple of friends, but if i can do it then anyone can!!!! I saw a guy out today in a modified wheel chair who was probably training for the Waikanae ride next weekend -- suddenly made me feel a lot better! What an inspiration.

Cheers Matt
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Postby neels on Mon 6/Oct/08 4:23pm

nessie wrote:I have three children and a full time job so finding time can be a struggle.
I sympathise with your situation :D


I like the theory of 'If you think you can, or you think you can't, in either case you're probably right"

If you're looking at this year you haven't given yourself much training time :crazy: but that's no reason not to give it a go. Get yourself out for some long rides, and spend some time on the hills & you might surprise yourself.

You'll never know if you don't try.
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Postby Trail on Mon 6/Oct/08 4:30pm

nessie wrote: .

I'm battling daily "its a long way/impossible/huge hills/you're dreaming" comments from well meaning bystanders.



Most of the nay-sayers are too lazy to ever do something like that! Ignore their ignorant lies and prove them all terribly wrong!!

The first few events might hurt, but it is a totally achievable goal, even for someone as busy as yourself.

Definitely get out on some bunch rides if at all possible. There is a fair bit of etiquette when riding in a bunch of cyclists. It is better to learn what this is before you are caught up in the middle of the event! A local friendly bike bunch ride (often run from cycling shops) can teach you how to ride in a bunch. Just ask people who usually ride if they are ok with bunch beginners looking to learn.
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RE: Newbie Needs Help!

Postby BiteMe on Mon 6/Oct/08 4:35pm

nessie wrote: Hi All,

I'm very new to cycling - bought a bike 12 weeks ago - and after having mastered the art of riding with clips I'm wanting to do an epic event. I'm keen on doing the Source to Sea and have been training at least 4 days a week for the 12 weeks. My longest ride to date is 80km. I have three children and a full time job so finding time can be a struggle.

My question is - am I dreaming about being able to complete the Source to Sea or should I stick to lazy lane cycling with the kids?

I have plenty of enthusiasm but am struggling with the mental aspect of it.

All responses gratefully received!
Nessie


Hey Nessie,

While I would never even attempt to compare my situation with yours, this might help. I have a lovely 1yr old daughter who I adore and fit most of my training around her, traveling to and from work is how I fit time on the bike. As Celia has said enthusiasm is the biggest key to it and people like Vorb'ers are great for that. I tend to do silly things like get up at the crack of dawn to ride a good hour or two to work in the mornings (Maybe 2-3 times a week). Variety is the spice of life so keep the rides changing ;) Hope this helps.

Cheers
TK
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