Tools Of The Trade

Postby XCwife on Thu 18/Sep/08 11:56am

If you don't have access to someone to make tools for you, here is some info on where we get ours:

concrete rakes
We purchase these from Hamptons ITM in Ferry Rd in Christchurch (approx $44). They look similar to the one in the picture below, but without the hook. They are useful for sparcing loose dirt off the track and for shaping berms.
concreterake.jpg
Concrete rake
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Postby XCwife on Thu 18/Sep/08 11:56am

Spades
We use Spear & Jackson ones (not the ergonomic design) which are about $40 at Mitre10. Every couple of trackbuilding sessions we sharpen the edge using a bench grinder. This makes a HUGE difference to their cutting power.
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Postby XCwife on Thu 18/Sep/08 11:57am

Grubbers
We use grubbers with a flat edge on one end and a pick end on the other. They are similar to the Atlas Pro ones that can be purchased at Mitre10 for around $64 or the blue Warrior Pro ones which are around $40. They have fiberglass handles. Again, the cutting edge is sharpened with a bench grinder. Wear eye protection when sharpening! We have also purchased the cheap grubbers at Super Cheap Auto but these tend to not last as well as more expensive ones.
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Postby XCwife on Thu 18/Sep/08 11:58am

Flags
These are imported from Hummert in the USA and cost about $46 for 100. Contact us for more information if you would like to purchase some, or let us know if you know where they can be bought in NZ

Here is the link http://www.hummert.com/catalog.asp?P=12707
Last edited by XCwife on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:09pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby XCwife on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:01pm

Loppers
These are in constant use as we clear a path through scrub and trim back overhanging greenery. The Fiskars ones with the interlocking mechanism (can't remember what that's called) are pretty good and they are light which is nice for carrying.

Chainsaws
This is great for cutting logs to length, clearing felled trees that are lying across the track, and clearing vegetation that is in the way of where you want to go. Ensure you wear all the necessary safety equipment when using a chainsaw - saefty glasses or visor, hearing protection, chaps and suitable footwear. We couldn't do without our chainsaw.
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Postby mtbrat on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:04pm

XCwife wrote: Loppers
These are in constant use as we clear a path through scrub and trim back overhanging greenery. The Fiskars ones with the interlocking mechanism (can't remember what that's called) are pretty good and they are light which is nice for carrying.


I rate these FISKARS as well, make sure you get the biggest one, around $100-$120. They have replaceable blades and should be sharpened regularly as well.

:)
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Postby XCwife on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:05pm

Measuring Tools

Inclinometers measure the degree or percentage of slope angle. The slope of the track (climbing/descending), the slope of the hill you are working on and the (out)slope of the track surface

To measure overall grade you can use an altimeter (as on lots of watches) for the start and finish heights and a calibrated bike computer to measure the distance of track between them.

An electronic level will also give you useful data.
Last edited by XCwife on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:24pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby RussS on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:14pm

All good stuff :thumbsup:
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Postby sifter on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:24pm

one of the most impressive tools we've used at Makara Peak for cutting new track through rooty dirt (not rocky) is a Pulaski (?). A fireman's tool, which is like a grubber on 'roids - more emphasis on the axe blade and less on the grubber "tooth". perfect for the roots...

MPS's garage is full of grubbers, with the odd pick, firerake, shovel/spades for gravelling, sledgehammer, crowbar, saws, loppers, etc etc. Most of our tools are purchased with grant money which seems to be reasonably forthcoming for this sort of thing (and according to our Treasurer is perfect from his point of view)
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Postby sifter on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:32pm

Pulaski:
cspoutdoors_2016_29229703.gif
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Postby herbman on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:46pm

mtbrat wrote:
XCwife wrote: Loppers
These are in constant use as we clear a path through scrub and trim back overhanging greenery. The Fiskars ones with the interlocking mechanism (can't remember what that's called) are pretty good and they are light which is nice for carrying.


I rate these FISKARS as well, make sure you get the biggest one, around $100-$120. They have replaceable blades and should be sharpened regularly as well.

:)


bahcos P16s are what we use here at work, and we would do far more cuts in a season prunning here than you guys would do in a life time track building
the P16 blade will cut up to 2" with out to much hassle and if you good and your feeling strong, cuts up to 3" can be done.

falco do a carbon fiber handle lopper the same size that are super light but have yet the a set for any lenght of time.
Last edited by herbman on Sat 20/Sep/08 11:53am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby XCwife on Thu 18/Sep/08 12:52pm

herbman wrote:

barcos P16s are what we use here at work, and we would do far more cuts in a season prunning here than you guys would do in a life time track building
the P16 blade will cut up to 2" with out to much hassle and if you good and your feeling strong, cuts up to 3" can be done.

falco do a carbon fiber handle lopper the same size that are super light but have yet the a set for any lenght of time.


Where can you buy them and how much are they?
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Postby Mtb_Babe on Thu 18/Sep/08 6:52pm

ditto

:)
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Postby herbman on Thu 18/Sep/08 9:41pm

here is a online store
http://www.farmbike.co.nz/hand_tools.htm#1132

but we get ours from CRT or PGG, as they gives us better deals ;)

not super flash but last well if you look after them.

and if you are after wee fold out pruning saws

these silky f180 saws are we its at, will cut about the same speed as a chainsaw as long as you have the energy.
http://www.buywright.co.nz/pruning.html
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Postby tartgrandmother on Thu 18/Sep/08 9:44pm

sifter wrote: Pulaski:


must be a few of them in south auckland, will have to go pick one up :satan:
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