Postby dh_winner on Thu 18/Sep/08 10:06pm

herbman wrote: here is a online store
http://www.farmbike.co.nz/hand_tools.htm#1132

but we get ours from CRT or PGG, as they gives us better deals ;)

not super flash but last well if you look after them.

and if you are after wee fold out pruning saws

these silky f180 saws are we its at, will cut about the same speed as a chainsaw as long as you have the energy.
http://www.buywright.co.nz/pruning.html


thats a very interesting site thanks! Lots od nice cutting things. I will be investigating those pulaskis too. Looks like an angry mattock.
dh_winner
Member for: 14 years 8 months

Postby pipe on Fri 19/Sep/08 12:18pm

Anyone have a good solution to the no chainsaws allowed to be used by volunteers in Vic park?

An old school logging saw would be cooll but I can't find them anywhere in NZ.

Carpentry saws and bow saws make tough work of it and pruning saws are too small.

That leaves pocket chain saws. How effective would these be for cutting up logs?
pipe
Member for: 11 years 1 month

Postby G on Fri 19/Sep/08 12:51pm

they're bloody good. just get some bar(plastic or steel) to make bigger handles. I have a pic of mates cutting 200mm diameter.
failing that put the money into a decent handsaw. I've bee using a $50 BAHCO saw that has some orange slippery coating on the blade. thought it was a gimmick but even in wet wood it's damn near as agood as a chain saw.

Cheers
G
G
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Member for: 12 years 1 month

Postby pipe on Fri 19/Sep/08 1:07pm

Good to know. I was reluctant to spend money on a decent handsaw if it was going to be crap for cutting wet logs. Thanks.
pipe
Member for: 11 years 1 month

Postby G on Fri 19/Sep/08 3:06pm

there is some technique to be learned but once nailed on dry stuff in the workshop you'll be sweet in 'real life'.
G
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Postby Giantman on Fri 19/Sep/08 6:53pm

pipe wrote: Anyone have a good solution to the no chainsaws allowed to be used by volunteers in Vic park?

An old school logging saw would be cooll but I can't find them anywhere in NZ.

Carpentry saws and bow saws make tough work of it and pruning saws are too small.

That leaves pocket chain saws. How effective would these be for cutting up logs?


could you use a heavy duty brush cutter/ scrub bar/ forestry clearing saw with a scrub blade on it, its all i use for dealing to stuff up to 300mm in diameter does take practice to use tho with out fucking teeth.

or look for a silky saw called a MASURU. they have teeth that get bigger further down the blade allowing them to cut bigger wood very fast. just dont use this saw when you want a nice cut, there extremely messy cutters but thats what you get for some thing that cuts everything fuckin fast.

i prefer to use these saws on for tree work as there as fast as chainsaw and hell of a lot lighter and easier to move in the tree with.



another piece of kit to look out for is a fire rake from levin saw makers there fucking awesome for doing most things on a trail.
Giantman
Member for: 11 years 10 months

Postby dh_winner on Fri 19/Sep/08 7:53pm

You need to get an old crosscut saw like this http://www.trademe.co.nz/Building-renov ... 651428.htm and go get it professionally sharpened and reset for wet wood. if you take good care of it (dont try saw stones or soil) it will eat anything.
dh_winner
Member for: 14 years 8 months

Postby pipe on Fri 19/Sep/08 8:34pm

dh_winner wrote: You need to get an old crosscut saw like this http://www.trademe.co.nz/Building-renov ... 651428.htm and go get it professionally sharpened and reset for wet wood. if you take good care of it (dont try saw stones or soil) it will eat anything.
Yep. That is looking the business.
pipe
Member for: 11 years 1 month

Postby XCwife on Fri 19/Sep/08 8:50pm

I remember getting a brochure on chainsaw safety from an A&P show a few years ago. I don't know if this is the same info, but it is a link to have a look at.

http://www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/catalogue/pdf/chainsaws-2006.pdf
XCwife
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"sunny side up"
Member for: 12 years 11 months

Postby SlackBoy on Sat 20/Sep/08 12:14am

dh_winner wrote:
herbman wrote: here is a online store
http://www.farmbike.co.nz/hand_tools.htm#1132

but we get ours from CRT or PGG, as they gives us better deals ;)

not super flash but last well if you look after them.

and if you are after wee fold out pruning saws

these silky f180 saws are we its at, will cut about the same speed as a chainsaw as long as you have the energy.
http://www.buywright.co.nz/pruning.html


thats a very interesting site thanks! Lots od nice cutting things. I will be investigating those pulaskis too. Looks like an angry mattock.
Can't say I'm a big fan of the pulaskis. speshly in welly with lots of rock. My preference is for a good heavy grubber. Pick on one end and nice wide blade on the other. Technique will allow for cutting of roots on different angles. Solid weight will get thru most stuff. Wooden handle's FTW also.
And a good set of forestry style pruning lopers (brands escape me).
SlackBoy
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Member for: 15 years 10 months

Postby sifter on Sat 20/Sep/08 8:54am

SlackBoy wrote:Can't say I'm a big fan of the pulaskis. speshly in welly with lots of rock. My preference is for a good heavy grubber. Pick on one end and nice wide blade on the other. Technique will allow for cutting of roots on different angles. Solid weight will get thru most stuff. Wooden handle's FTW also.
And a good set of forestry style pruning lopers (brands escape me).


You're mostly right about the grubber trumping the pulaski. It's perfect for cutting new track where there's not a lot of rock though. gunslinger has one which he used to great effect on parts of Lazy Fern, and a couple of K Bros jobs where there were lots of roots to get through.
sifter
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Member for: 13 years 11 months

Postby dh_winner on Sat 20/Sep/08 9:46am

XCwife wrote: I remember getting a brochure on chainsaw safety from an A&P show a few years ago. I don't know if this is the same info, but it is a link to have a look at.

http://www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/catalogue/pdf/chainsaws-2006.pdf


Ive got that brochure kicking around somewhere from when i did a Chainsaw course a couple of years ago. Its mostly common sense with a few tips and tricks thrown in. Chainsaws are not that dangerous if you being sensible. Its just when your not being sensible and shit goes wrong, it goes wrong in a big way.
dh_winner
Member for: 14 years 8 months

Postby herbman on Tue 23/Sep/08 1:39pm

dh_winner wrote:
XCwife wrote: I remember getting a brochure on chainsaw safety from an A&P show a few years ago. I don't know if this is the same info, but it is a link to have a look at.

http://www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/catalogue/pdf/chainsaws-2006.pdf


Ive got that brochure kicking around somewhere from when i did a Chainsaw course a couple of years ago. Its mostly common sense with a few tips and tricks thrown in. Chainsaws are not that dangerous if you being sensible. Its just when your not being sensible and shit goes wrong, it goes wrong in a big way.


speaking of chain saws

we have found these wee echos really good, as in they do 40 hours a week for six months a year with out any major hassles, and our oldest one is pushing 5 years old now.

and they are not to badly priced.

http://www.buywright.co.nz/pruning%20chainsaws.html
herbman
Member for: 14 years 4 months

Postby G on Wed 1/Oct/08 10:24am

Just seen these could be a handy tool for building solid berms etc.
About $60 for chain and hose(for handles)

Cheers
G
rock net.jpg
rock net in action.jpg
G
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Member for: 12 years 1 month

Postby Trail on Wed 1/Oct/08 10:39am

Oooooh, that does look like a cunning rock moving plan!
Trail
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"Concentrating on technique"
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