Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby papalazarou on Mon 28/Oct/13 7:02pm

Hi,

I am looking for a tent that I can take tramping for my two kids and I to sleep in on an overnight tramp. this is something i want to do more and more as the kids get older. They are 6 and 4. I went on a hour tramp (2 hour with my daughter) last year and it was great. My son wants to join us this year. When I go tramping I will be going with a mate, and between us we will be taking 2 tents, all the food etc. The kids might take their pillow/clothes but that will be it.

I have narrowed it down to two options:

http://www.equipoutdoors.co.nz/contents ... bus_3.html

http://www.equipoutdoors.co.nz/contents ... ligan.html

The nimbus 3 is going for $150, the hooligan for $175. The hooligan will be more spacious and has a better vestibule with groundsheet. If my wife decides to join us at some stage we can all sleep in the hooligan. The only issue is the hooligan is 2kg heaver than the nimbus 3 (7kg as opposed to 5kg).

Now what I am wondering, from experts out in vorbland, is will that 2kg kill me on a 2hr tramp considering I have my two kids gear? Is the extra 2kg that much, it doesn't sound it, but i could be heaps after 2 hours of walking/stopping. i am relatively fit if that matters. if i go for the hooligan will i curse that 2kg?

any advice greatly appreciated!
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby nagem on Mon 28/Oct/13 8:23pm

2kg will make you stronger.
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby slidecontrol on Mon 28/Oct/13 8:27pm

depends how lomg you are staying out, if that 2kg is needed for food etc, it might bug you. for an overnight with a 2hour walk in, possibly not. Give a kg each of supplies to the young'uns and the difference is sorted.

edit: maybe 500gm for the 4y-o
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby disoriented on Mon 28/Oct/13 9:00pm

A heavy pack's a trampers worse nightmare and I wouldnt be tramping with a 5kg tent, you will be cursing it! Especailly with young kids as your packs going to weigh a ton with all their gear and food. You can ask my parents if you want to ask some one who has been there done that. Tramping with a party of 4 the best option is two two man tents as finding tent sites for a large tent can be interesting at times.

I would be saving my pennies and buy a better and lighter tent as cheap tents aren't know to be the most waterproof things in the world and there is nothing worse than waiting out a storm in a tent that leaks.

While your kids are young you can fit all 3 of you into a two man tent by top and tailing your kinds in the same sleping bag, saves more weight, if you've got a sleeping bag that has a bottom zip on it!

If you cant afford a good tent (your be looking at $500+ for a good one), NZ has a bloodly brillant Hut network with lots of options for family overnighters i just hope you dont entend on going to the waituks or great walks and dealling with doc curseded hut booking system

I would start off getting kids to carry there jacket, jersey and maybe their sleeping bag. flag taking pillow cases as you can always use a stuff bag and stuff it with clothes instead.

I very rarely take my tent with me tramping (Macpac Mineret) and its a bit over two kgs, i'm normally more in favour of a bivy bag accomidations but that is really no help to your situation as im young fit and some what foolhardy and have no dependants

Couple of 3 man options on sale at the mo that weigh about half the weight of the lightest tent you were looking at:

http://www.bivouac.co.nz/gear/camping-a ... -tent.html
http://www.bivouac.co.nz/gear/camping-a ... -tent.html

Random things that i would be looking for in a tent, dual entry if your've got kids, double vestable, alloy poles( tuck load stronger and lighter than fibre glass poles and ive seen a lot of fibre glass poles break), double walled so it has an inner 'tent' and outer waterproof fly, tub floor, and maybe a single pitch system ie the tent and fly go up as one rather putting tent up then the fly over the top

Of and if your new to this tramping thingmewhats it, I highly recommend taking a bushcraft course with your local tramping club, as you will learn loads even if they do seem full of old people. (if your wellys based i high reccomend the TTC one even though i donot have the joy of instructing on it this year)
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby cruiser on Mon 28/Oct/13 9:48pm

you must have machines for kids. Mine wouldn't have tramped 2hrs [wgtn topograhpy] at that age.
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby Simonius_Titius on Mon 28/Oct/13 9:50pm

Teh asians worked out how to make cheap waterproof nylon about 30 years ago IIRC, before that cheap tents were definitely a dumb idea.

15 years ago my wife impulse bought a huge dome tent from Deka, scarily cheap.
I was horrified and figured it would last for one or two summer holidays at most. But it just kept going year after year, and turned out to be a better buy than a quality tent.

We survived some quite big winds and, even after a few years, nearly a week of truly torrential rain.
Minor repairs were needed occasionally - sewing thread, contact adhesive and a wee bit of fabric should be carried.

A quality tent will pay off if you have to camp in exposed places in high winds or heavy snow, but family trips are often sheltered.
Last edited by Simonius_Titius on Mon 28/Oct/13 10:40pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby MagellanGPSnz on Mon 28/Oct/13 10:03pm

http://www.hennessyhammock.com/

light, easy to use, comfy, dry, no worries about rocks, wet ground etc
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby cruiser on Mon 28/Oct/13 10:15pm

Genius!! haha, I want one!
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby Farm on Mon 28/Oct/13 10:16pm

I've just bought a Kathmandu Taku tent at about 4.5kg. It's pretty hefty, I have only pitched it in the lounge so far. I'd be ok carting it along with gear for a lazy 6 year old. I'm neither young or particularly fit but it'll only be 2-4 hours walking or biking. And covering a fairly short distance in that time, stopping to find bugs, play in the stream, eat snacks etc.
I have previously tramped long distances with heavy loads so I'm pretty comfortable.

I'd hoped to get her out for an overnight trip this weekend but she's a bit scared of the dark, wind, lack of electronic devices etc so I'll wait for near perfect conditions.
We did a little walk over into Butterfly Creek today and she did it under her own power.
The bigger tent will also be handy for camping from the car and things as well.

If you're resigned to carrying 15-20kg of family gear an extra 2kg of tent is neither here not there in my opinion. You're not setting off for 70km of bush bashing.
Maybe load up your pack with the equivilant weight and go for a good long walk to see how it feels?

I also bought my partner some nice Ortlieb panniers for her birthday. When she said how much she liked them I replied " now the tent will fit on your carrier". So I've got that going for me as well :sly:
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby Simonius_Titius on Tue 29/Oct/13 1:25am

MagellanGPSnz wrote:http://www.hennessyhammock.com/

light, easy to use, comfy, dry, no worries about rocks, wet ground etc

I didn't like sleeping in a hammock, only tried it a couple of times though.

Spreader bars are needed to stop you getting trapped like a fly in a web.
People need to move around quite a bit while sleeping. Face down doesn't work, and curled up sideways is sometimes not so good either.
Making the hammock flatter gives more flexibility, though that needs more tension and is limited by the risk of tipping.
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby EoinC on Tue 29/Oct/13 10:33am

Simonius_Titius wrote:
MagellanGPSnz wrote:http://www.hennessyhammock.com/

light, easy to use, comfy, dry, no worries about rocks, wet ground etc

I didn't like sleeping in a hammock, only tried it a couple of times though.

Spreader bars are needed to stop you getting trapped like a fly in a web.
People need to move around quite a bit while sleeping. Face down doesn't work, and curled up sideways is sometimes not so good either.
Making the hammock flatter gives more flexibility, though that needs more tension and is limited by the risk of tipping.

I've had one of these for about 6 years. I bought it for my old boat. It's good - easy to get in and out of, and comfortable (and doesn't need spreaders, as the entry / exist is through the middle, not over the side). Only problem on the boat (an old gaff-rigger) is that the hammock needs to also have lateral ties, otherwise it comes close to doing 360's on the x-axis when waves hit.
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby Riley-NZL on Sat 9/Nov/13 5:33pm

I've got a $300 Two person tent that weighs 2.6kg and I would hate to imagine what carrying two or three times that would be like. I guess if you're going light on the rest of the gear you'd be alright, I'd get the kids some small day packs and give them what they can comfortably carry to make it easier on you.
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Re: Tent Advice For Tramping

Postby danose on Sun 10/Nov/13 7:16am

the max weight you can comfortably carry comes down to your fitness, the time you have to carry it for and the terrain.

Now I'm guessing that at least initially time carried will be really short (you said 1-2 hours tops) and the terrain pretty mild (good, flatish easy tracks).

so what I'd do is get your existing pack, load it up with all the gear that you'd be carrying for you and the kids (so clothes, food, cooker) and and then add a suitable dummy weight to simulate the tent (1.25l bottles of water are good for this) and see if the total pack weight is something you can handle.

personally I normally aim for 12kg pack weight if possible, and am quite happy on rough (mountaineering) terrain with even 15kg (well maybe a bit of cursing). By the time my pack hits 18kg I'm breaking out the hiking poles and muttering lots - but guys I know who hunt (and therefore end up hiking out with bits of deer in/on their pack) seem to handle MUCH bigger loads - so it's very much personal

talking of poles - they're great for helping handle big loads (extra stability and the ability to engage '4wd' uphill) and for prodding whinging kids :satan: You don't have to splash out on flash collapsibles either - a dirt cheap pair of ski poles (2nd hand) cut to the right length work well and cost very little (or can often be picked up for free if you have enough ski-bum gear-freak friends)
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