Re: Post Your Ride 2019

Postby Velocipedestrian on Tue 9th Jul 10:38am

Nice, lots of linkage. Report?
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"Now bicycles were never made for pale green pants to ride 'em. Especially spooky pale green pants with nobody inside 'em."
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Re: Post Your Ride 2019

Postby AgrAde on Tue 9th Jul 7:32pm

The least fatiguing, most grippiest, most planted, most stable-for-the-size, most efficient underfoot (both pedalling and pumping the bike etc) 160mm bike that there is. To put it simply. :thumbsup:

It adds a little bit of weight, and I guess removes a small amount of drivetrain efficiency though I don't really feel it, but the advantages outweigh that so much that it's less than a non-issue. And from all accounts the frames are very strong. it's also very stiff, which I didn't expect.

It pedals like a peppy 140mm bike, except with super low pedal feedback. You can stand up, get full on the gas with flat pedals, and just huss it over rooty chundery crap and not have to worry at all.

Your body input into the bike feels like it's going into a 140mm trail bike, set up firm. Normally I run very little sag - 20-25% in the rear I guess. On this bike I'm near 30% and loving it. I can run more because I can run enough compression damping to provide support instead of relying on the spring. The bike feels over-damped in the carpark - pumping the bike and through turns, it feels like you're pushing substantially against the damper. It makes it incredibly responsive to all of your inputs.

it can be set up this way because the suspension is so easily activated from the terrain. The over-damped feel is gone as soon as you see choppy shitty terrain going under your feet and it pretty much just disappears. My 170mm 36 is completely outclassed and so I'm putting a coil helm on there to hopefully add some more capability to the front, to feel like i'm testing the rear end before my wrists and hands give out.

People who talk shit on high pivot bikes because of "brake jack" are fools. The suspension sags slightly under braking. it's great. It remains active and still works mint, and getting back on a normal bike makes you realise how much they pitch you forward under braking, and how much you have to compensate with body position.

The bike doesn't shorten as much when the suspension is compressed. Most 160mm bikes will shorten at the back end by ~5-10mm at bottom out. This bike extends by 48mm. The overall wheelbase still shortens as you go through the stroke thanks to the fork, but to a much much lesser extent than a normal bike. The bike feels very stable in really high load situations.
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Member for: 15 years 7 months

Re: Post Your Ride 2019

Postby Velocipedestrian on Tue 9th Jul 8:04pm

Sounds delicious, I hope you get some time on a Druid to compare.
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"Now bicycles were never made for pale green pants to ride 'em. Especially spooky pale green pants with nobody inside 'em."
Member for: 12 years 9 months

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