Postby BiteMe on Mon 6/Oct/08 6:56pm

Oh should have mentioned, well that is I was told to mention that I have a very supportive wife :D ha ha 'wife smiles as she says this...'
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Postby nessie on Tue 7/Oct/08 9:07am

That's all excellent advice and I have taken it all on board. I have found a local bikeshop that runs bunch riding lessons so have signed up to do one of them and learn the basic etiquette. Hopefully I'll be able to join one of their bunch rides as well during the week.

I live in the Moutere Hills so much like nzmatto everytime I head out the door its either up hill out or up hill home.

My husband, who has been great, said that it doesn't matter how long it takes me. I'll have lights on my bike and they will wait at the end for as long as it takes.

So, I'm going to sign up today! I will continue to train as much as possible and get some long rides in each weekend.

It has been brilliant to get feedback from people who understand why I want to do this event. I no longer feel like the 40 yr old frump with something missing. My entire family has been supportive with my five year old even offering me her training wheels when I fell off using clips for the first time. My14 yr old son said "I'd be so proud of you mum if you did this" and wrote me a training schedule (he rides mountain bikes). No pressure!

So thank you for balancing the negative thoughts. I never thought the mental aspect would be as difficult as the physical.

Nessie
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Postby molotovd on Tue 7/Oct/08 9:16am

nessie wrote: I never thought the mental aspect would be as difficult as the physical.

Nessie


Mental aspect is everything. Even if you aren't physically ready, but you are mentally you can do absolutely anything. I learnt that when i was in military training. Physcology ( cant spell it ) has everything to do with it.
If you prepare your mind to the task, no matter how absurd the job is, if you make your mind know you can do it. You WILL succeed.

Sounds like you are doing it for the right reasons and you know that you want to.
you'll be fine. Let us know how you're getting on! :thumbsup:
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Postby chchbob on Tue 7/Oct/08 9:25am

nessie wrote: That's all excellent advice and I have taken it all on board. I have found a local bikeshop that runs bunch riding lessons so have signed up to do one of them and learn the basic etiquette. Hopefully I'll be able to join one of their bunch rides as well during the week.

I live in the Moutere Hills so much like nzmatto everytime I head out the door its either up hill out or up hill home.

My husband, who has been great, said that it doesn't matter how long it takes me. I'll have lights on my bike and they will wait at the end for as long as it takes.

So, I'm going to sign up today! I will continue to train as much as possible and get some long rides in each weekend.

It has been brilliant to get feedback from people who understand why I want to do this event. I no longer feel like the 40 yr old frump with something missing. My entire family has been supportive with my five year old even offering me her training wheels when I fell off using clips for the first time. My14 yr old son said "I'd be so proud of you mum if you did this" and wrote me a training schedule (he rides mountain bikes). No pressure!

So thank you for balancing the negative thoughts. I never thought the mental aspect would be as difficult as the physical.

Nessie


Great that you have the family support, I doubt that most of us would be able to get out and train unless we were single or had a very supportive family. Mine is so good I get home to pancakes, bacon and bananas most Sundays for brunch after a ride ... :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

And yep having kids that think it great or look up to your achivement is a bonus.
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Postby nessie on Tue 7/Oct/08 9:33am

If you prepare your mind to the task, no matter how absurd the job is, if you make your mind know you can do it. You WILL succeed.


You hit the mark exactly molotovd. This will become my mantra. In fact I may print in big letters and pin it above my desk.

I'll be talking to my family about upping their level of support chchbob to include a cooked brunch on Sundays!
nessie
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Postby JaredTheAmazing on Tue 7/Oct/08 11:23am

Awesome stuff :thumbsup: I'm not a 'real' racer, just it a punt occasionally.

Remember to prep the bike as well as prepping the body. Suggest getting local bike shop or your MTB son to look over your bike a week or two out. Even (or especially) if you bought it brand new, 12 weeks plus the next month of regular riding will have everything settling/stretching/loosening. LBS can tweak, tune and generally make your bike feel loved.

If nothing else its good for peace of mind. Good luck, enjoy....
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Postby XCrazy on Tue 7/Oct/08 11:44am

Mental training is often quite neglected in training even though it is really important. Have a read over this article to get an over view on the important parts:

http://www.pezcyclingnews.com/default.a ... ry&id=4647

If you want to read more have a look at this:

http://www.pezcyclingnews.com/?pg=fullstory&id=6174

Don't get bogged down in all this though. Key thing is get out there and enjoy what you are doing, have confidence in yourself because you can dot it!

Good luck!!
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Postby Oli on Tue 7/Oct/08 8:29pm

Nice one, Nessie! Great goal, and your great attitude makes you sound to me like you'll have no problem achieving whatever you decide. Good stuff. :)

Kudos to Vorb for a unanimously positive thread too! :thumbsup:
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Postby dented on Tue 7/Oct/08 9:49pm

Oli wrote: NiceKudos to Vorb for a unanimously positive thread too! :thumbsup:

Yes, the weirdest thing in a long time.
I too would like to offer some positive support. There is nothing more satisfying than completing an event that pushes your physical and mental boundaries. I always find, no matter how painful it is to drag yourself to the finish, within 5 minutes you feel so good you swear you could go and do a victory lap.
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Postby nzmatto on Wed 8/Oct/08 7:01am

I'll test that theory when I complete 100km's for the first time this weekend!!!
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Postby RJM on Wed 8/Oct/08 7:40am

Hi Nessie,

training for this one myself - what are you riding ?

Oh - and where are the Moutere Hills ?
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Postby nessie on Wed 8/Oct/08 8:41am

Hi RJM

I bought a woman's Specialized Elite road bike from the brillantly helpful people at Village Cycles in Richmond. I live not far from the Moutere Village - do you live out that way?

How's your training going? Any secret tips other than just train train and then train some more...

After all the positive responses I got from people I signed up for Source to Sea...now there is no going back!

Nessie
nessie
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Postby RJM on Thu 9/Oct/08 9:57am

I'm in Wellington - heaps of good roading biking here in theory (but the roads are very unsafe) - lots of hill work.

Haven't been through the Buller Gorge for years - can't remember much - is it mainly downhil ?l
RJM
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Postby nessie on Mon 20/Oct/08 9:39am

My training update (for anyone who's interested?)

I did 106 km on Sunday in 4 hrs 30 min (with a 15min banana stop). I know that's not rocket speed but I am so proud of myself!!!

I had intended to go for at least 110-120km but misjudged the distance slightly and ended up at the end of our road and couldn't really bring myself to ride past the house.

I felt pretty good at the end and learned - a) you can never drink too much water, b) bananas are great but a sugar rush would have better, c) riding with someone else breaks the monotony and makes me keep a better pace (and do hills I might otherwise have turned away from) and most importantly, pace is everything. I need to make sure I don't go like the clappers to start with or I wont make it.

I will struggle to find the time to do a longer ride before source to sea. Is this an issue? I am doing the Rotoiti to Renwick which is 90km as a bit more of a bunch riding lesson.

I'm loving this. I've never felt so good. I know if I maintain a good steady pace I will do the 160km!
nessie
Member for: 9 years 0 months

Postby chchbob on Mon 20/Oct/08 10:04am

nessie wrote: My training update (for anyone who's interested?)

I did 106 km on Sunday in 4 hrs 30 min (with a 15min banana stop). I know that's not rocket speed but I am so proud of myself!!!

I had intended to go for at least 110-120km but misjudged the distance slightly and ended up at the end of our road and couldn't really bring myself to ride past the house.

I'm loving this. I've never felt so good. I know if I maintain a good steady pace I will do the 160km!


:thumbsup: Well done and keep it up, you definately got the right attitude. Practise eating on the bike as well, saves time. :D
I have to admit to passing the house and going around the block a couple of times early on just to get the distance 'right', can't arrive home from your first few long rides a few hundred metres short ... lol
chchbob
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