Re: New Road Rims - Where To Find Pacentis

Postby great uncle bulgaria on Mon 29/Dec/14 8:09pm

wolffman1 wrote:Logical choice.
The anodising on both the grey and black rims will wear off the brake track pretty swiftly, ie a few days it looks patchy. If this shits you the other option is to go for the silver rim.
Silver spokes are always good, essential if you go for the silver rims.
My set are going on an orange bike so I'm going with black spokes on the black rims but with silver hubs.
I've got an eBay sourced white industry rear hub and am waiting for a suitable front hub to show up.


some lovely builds here.
http://dcrwheels.co.uk/gallery/

you putting them on steel?
great uncle bulgaria
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Re: New Road Rims - When Are The Old Ones Too Worn?

Postby wolffman1 on Tue 30/Dec/14 10:52am

Yep, they will go onto my surly cross check eventually. It's over on the road bike thread.
I'm running the ksyrium SLs on it at the moment and they are going really well. I've taken them to a couple of mountain bike tracks and they are coping well. No jumps but they have coped with a few clumsy whacks with no problems, but looking forward to getting wider rims to get some bigger tyres on it.
Good fun bike. I went out looking for dirt roads on Boxing Day and saw more people walking than in cars. Magic ride
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Re: New Road Rims - When Are The Old Ones Too Worn?

Postby wolffman1 on Sat 14/Mar/15 9:51am

Did you end up getting your wheels made up?
I just got mine back and they go pretty well. They are on some white industry hubs 32 spokes and 3x so should be hard wearing.

They are on the surly in commuter mode at the moment so haven't had a chance to take them out and thrash them but the brake tracks are really grabby with the anodising on them. I'm hoping this eases a little as the tracks wear in.
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Re: New Road Rims - When Are The Old Ones Too Worn?

Postby great uncle bulgaria on Wed 18/Mar/15 1:09am

wolffman1 wrote:Did you end up getting your wheels made up?
I just got mine back and they go pretty well. They are on some white industry hubs 32 spokes and 3x so should be hard wearing.

They are on the surly in commuter mode at the moment so haven't had a chance to take them out and thrash them but the brake tracks are really grabby with the anodising on them. I'm hoping this eases a little as the tracks wear in.


not yet
sitting in the box awaiting the space time and money to get em going. some way off methinks :(
loving my a23 on hope pro2s though on the cross bike - i imagine hplussons similar but betterer :thumbsup:
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Re: New Road Rims - Where To Find Pacentis

Postby Simonius_Titius on Wed 18/Mar/15 2:00am

great uncle bulgaria wrote:how to reliably assess rim wear* . .

Run a straightedge (credit card) around the rim first to find the deepest point. Especially for a rear wheel as these are often bent.

If the wear is a simple groove in the middle brake track then the depth gauge of a vernier caliper is fine, or failing that use the corner of a piece of paper with the card then plonk that on a ruler to measure it.
Holding the vernier caliper straight can be tricky but you can just wobble it back and forth while watching for the deepest reading.

If there is not an unworn bit of brake track on both sides of the groove at the deepest point a straightedge and a slip of paper as a depth gauge will work. Or try using the jaws of a vernier caliper over the whole width of the rim and measure the gap by eyeball or feeler gauges.

Mavic gave 0.4mm as maximum safe wear for one of their lightweight rims I checked. That would be for the rated tyre pressure and rider weight.
Older, sturdier rims could afford to lose a lot more.

To measure the thickness of the rim directly, find a wee nut thicker than the clincher hook to put inside the rim so you can use the vernier caliper, then subtract the thickness of the nut and the brake groove.

When the rim gets scary thin, scratch "60psi max!" next to the valve hole and put it on a small bike for a skinny girl. Set the brake shoes to rub as low as possible, to reduce wear and bending of the weak point.

If the brake track has been bent under inflation pressure so the track is no longer parallel I would consider the rim at risk of catastrophic failure due to bending fatigue. I have seen a rim bent like this with evidence of surviving in that state long enough to have a lot more wear put on the brake track, but the risk is getting silly at this point. A section of rim can crack suddenly, I'd worry it might cause a brake lockup and/or blowout.
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