Re: Journal Watch

Postby E Dogg Capizzle on Sun 21/Mar/10 5:06pm

cruiser wrote:haha, now I'm talking to myself...

Do craig kennetts posts all get deleted??? or does he delete them himself?


I've deleted a bunch of them. Don't respond to the guy, I wouldn't even bother to read the posts.
E Dogg Capizzle
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Member for: 15 years 2 months

Re: Journal Watch

Postby cruiser on Sun 21/Mar/10 6:06pm

I wasn't that bothered with him saying I'd grown mammaries...

He's probably right I'm getting softer in my old age :D
cruiser
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Member for: 8 years 11 months

Re: Journal Watch

Postby Fergie on Sun 18/Apr/10 6:48pm

Cycling shoe aerodynamics
Giuseppe Gibertini • Donato Grassi •
Carlo Macchi • Giuseppe De Bortoli

Sports Eng (2010) 12:155–161

Abstract The present paper describes the activity carried
out to investigate the aerodynamic effects of cycling shoes
for time trial competitions. This subject has not been
widely studied but can be important for an accurate aerodynamic
optimisation of a time trial cyclist. The study was
carried out by means of wind tunnel testing: an appropriate
test setup and an appropriate test procedure (based on
‘‘effective angle of attack approach’’) were developed in
order to produce realistic test conditions. The developed
testing procedure was applied to two different shoe models,
differently fastened. Furthermore, an important point was
the investigation of the overshoe effect. The results showed
that the power required to overcome the shoe’s drag is
almost a tenth of the total power and that differences
between the shoes can affect the cyclist’s performance.
Fergie
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"Fat, opinionated and can't ride a bike to save himself. Sounds overqualified to be a coach."
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Re: Journal Watch

Postby Joel on Sun 18/Apr/10 7:24pm

but don't TT shoe covers sort this out?
Joel
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"Style over speed"
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Re: Journal Watch

Postby Fergie on Sun 18/Apr/10 8:18pm

Will have to have a good look at the paper at some point but appears that the bootie increases the power demands of riding. I suspect they are using the collar of the bootie to determine frontal surface area which makes it a larger area than a shoe even with the effect of straps and buckles. But unless freakishly hot I would be racing in a lycra bootie.
Fergie
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"Fat, opinionated and can't ride a bike to save himself. Sounds overqualified to be a coach."
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Re: Journal Watch

Postby Joel on Sun 18/Apr/10 8:40pm

would like to see a study publishing the varous cda of shoes. now that would be cool! I guess, the more vented the shoe, the worse the aerodynamics.. as well as buckles vs straps.

makes sense, the impact on power.. with the shoes catching a lot of wind. agree with you fergie, think i will wear my tt booties at my next couple of road races.
Joel
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"Style over speed"
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Re: Journal Watch

Postby Mr_Jolly on Tue 25/May/10 8:32pm

I read the report in the Dim Post today about the study showing a lack of benefit of high carb breakfast prior to training. The article said it is published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in sports...but I buggered if I can find a link to it. The study was done by Steve STANNARD and I'd be grateful if someone can point me in the right direction to read the full report.

Cheers
Mr_Jolly
Member for: 11 years 1 month

Re: Journal Watch

Postby cruiser on Tue 25/May/10 10:39pm

Here you go mr jolly, the Full PDF is 5 pages long, doesn't really say much more. Lydiard has been saying this for years. Interesting the sex difference.

Adaptations to skeletal muscle with endurance exercise training in the acutely fed versus overnight-fasted state

We would like to dedicate this paper to the memory of our friend, colleague and co-author, Dr Hans Edge, who was tragically killed on the 25th March 2010 in Auckland whilst riding his bicycle home from work.
Stephen R. Stannarda, b, , , Alex J. Buckleyc, Johann A. Edged and Martin W. Thompsonb

a Institute of Food Nutrition and Human Health, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

b School of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Sydney, Lidcombe, Australia

c Diabetes Unit, Australian Health Policy Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

d Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Received 11 February 2009; revised 21 December 2009; accepted 17 March 2010. Available online 7 May 2010.

Abstract
Minimising carbohydrate (CHO) status in the peri-training period may accelerate the training adaptations normally observed. The aim of this study was to compare adaptations to endurance training undertaken in the acutely CHO fed and overnight-fasted states. Eight female and six male untrained, healthy participants: aged 26.6 ± 5.8 years (mean ± SD); height 174.7 ± 7.6 cm; weight 75.3 ± 11.4 kg; VO2max 3.48 ± 0.67 l/min; were randomly divided into two training groups and undertook four weeks of five days per week endurance cycle ergometer training in either the overnight-fasted (FAST) or acutely fed (FED) state. FAST training had no effect on RER or plasma glucose, lactate and FFA concentrations during subsequent submaximal exercise. Training-induced changes in Vastus lateralis citrate synthase (CS) and 3-hydroxy-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activities were not different between training groups (P = 0.655 and 0.549, respectively), but when the effect of gender was considered, men responded better to FAST and women responded better to FED. The FAST group showed a significantly greater training-induced increase in VO2max and resting muscle glycogen concentration than FED (P = 0.014 and P = 0.047 respectively), but there was no gender interaction. In conclusion, these results suggest that (a) meal ingestion prior to daily exercise can modify some of the exercise training-induced adaptations normally seen with endurance training compared to when daily exercise is undertaken in the overnight-fasted state; and (b) the extent of these adaptations in skeletal muscle differ slightly between men and women.
cruiser
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Member for: 8 years 11 months

Re: Journal Watch

Postby bubbaa on Tue 25/May/10 11:15pm

Pretty early days in this line of investigation methinks

http://www.medconnect.com.au/tabid/84/s ... fault.aspx

The current findings suggest that training in the fasted state provides some benefits over training in the fed state, and that the muscles of women respond better to fed training on some measures. The increase in peak VO2 with overnight fasting was an unexpected finding that contrasts with results from at least one prior study, and thus should be “treated with caution” pending confirmation in larger studies, the investigators wrote.
bubbaa
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Re: Journal Watch

Postby cruiser on Wed 26/May/10 10:09am

yeah i reads that. plenty of studies contradict though, intuitively I agree with the concept. the variable may be in the untrained athletes, or probably the intensity and duration? (trained at 65%, rides were 25, 50, 75, 100min) who knows? it's not too earth shattering
cruiser
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Member for: 8 years 11 months

Re: Journal Watch

Postby Mr_Jolly on Wed 26/May/10 12:55pm

so half an hour on the trainer before brekky isn't going to make me a sub 5 hour Taupo rider then??
Mr_Jolly
Member for: 11 years 1 month

Re: Journal Watch

Postby cruiser on Wed 26/May/10 1:38pm

everyone's looking for a shortcut :lol:
cruiser
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Member for: 8 years 11 months

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