Postby BrokenKonaRider on Mon 8/Sep/08 4:44pm

Nope, the native strawberries are best. That's a fact. And they're tiny.
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Postby herbman on Mon 8/Sep/08 4:47pm

BrokenKonaRider wrote: Nope, the native strawberries are best. That's a fact. And they're tiny.
prove it?

size has nothing to do with taste.
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Postby Henry Dorset Case on Mon 8/Sep/08 4:56pm

phunk wrote: Our vege garden, just built a second one next to it.


are you in prison?
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Postby scatter on Mon 8/Sep/08 4:59pm

Bigfoot wrote: Exactly - and its ALL local...


Nice reduction of your carbon footprint Mr Foot of Big :rolleyes:
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Postby phunk on Mon 8/Sep/08 5:01pm

:pmob: Local produce often has a larger "carbon footprint" than non-local.

Global warming being a crock of shit doesnt help either...
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Postby scatter on Mon 8/Sep/08 5:02pm

phunk wrote: :pmob: Local produce often has a larger "carbon footprint" than non-local.

Global warming being a crock of shit doesnt help either...


Yes dear :rolleyes:

Global warming is what is keeping me in a job, so I'll take it :p
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Postby Bigfoot on Mon 8/Sep/08 5:04pm

Local = not picked under ripe = flavour
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Postby Henry Dorset Case on Mon 8/Sep/08 5:06pm

scatter wrote:
phunk wrote: :pmob: Local produce often has a larger "carbon footprint" than non-local.

Global warming being a crock of shit doesnt help either...


Yes dear :rolleyes:

Global warming is what is keeping me in a job, so I'll take it :p


about ten degrees C of global warming, and no wind and yesterday would have been a nice day. Just saying.
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Postby Thermo on Tue 9/Sep/08 11:42pm

Astoria Paranoia wrote:
Butch wrote:Fecking agapanthas running riots grumble grumble :hmmm:


If you think you have a problem you should see my pereniums :0


There's no way in hell I want to see your perineum.
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Postby Astoria Paranoia on Tue 9/Sep/08 11:46pm

Thermo wrote:
Astoria Paranoia wrote:
Butch wrote:Fecking agapanthas running riots grumble grumble :hmmm:


If you think you have a problem you should see my pereniums :0


There's no way in hell I want to see your perineum.

A sniff would suffice :)
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Postby Jono on Wed 10/Sep/08 12:33am

phunk wrote: :pmob: Local produce often has a larger "carbon footprint" than non-local.

Global warming being a crock of shit doesnt help either...


I've got no complaints with global commerce (or food for that matter. If we worried about food miles we'd be rather large hypocrites given that we are a primary exporter). Anyways, what really gets me is that the watties apricots are from south africa. Not because I've been fooled, but because they taste like shit. Hard, tasteless little fuckers.

I feel a great sense of loss that I can no longer get the really nice tinned apricots from southland (because the factory closed down after being run over by cheap chinese imports). I was perfectly happy to pay more for ripe, tart full-o-flavour apricots on my cereal dammit.

At least I can get really nice spanish peach halves. I think it was something about growing up in NZ in the 70s - mum used to preserve fruit every year, and so peaches are best as halves. It was a common form of fruit in the UK, but confuses me stupid about how all of our peaches in NZ have to be chopped up into little bits.

Herbman: any thoughts on this conundrum?
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Postby Jono on Wed 10/Sep/08 12:36am

herbman wrote:my ass


Precisely. The secret to good strawberries is to [b]buy or eat them in season, dammit[b]. The best berries are those left to grow naturally, rather than the hydroponic ones. I planted a bunch (about 20) small strawberry plants at the start of winter, so I'm hopeful that we'll have a nice crop to go with the established plants we had nice berries from last year.
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Postby sweet_P on Wed 10/Sep/08 12:41am

Jono wrote:I feel a great sense of loss that I can no longer get the really nice tinned apricots from southland (because the factory closed down after being run over by cheap chinese imports).


I miss those Roxdale apricots too - a million times better than any others available...

Jono wrote: I think it was something about growing up in NZ in the 70s - mum used to preserve fruit every year, and so peaches are best as halves.


Me and my mum did a whole bunch of preserving last summer - Central Otago apricots and peaches - soooooooooooo goooooooooood :love: (Didn't last long though!)
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Postby Jono on Wed 10/Sep/08 1:03am

sweet_P wrote:I miss those Roxdale apricots too - a million times better than any others available...


Yeah. That was them. Joanne Black mentioned in an article in the listener that the factory had closed about a year back - although the stocks have managed to hold out until about a month ago at the local new worlds.

Me and my mum did a whole bunch of preserving last summer - Central Otago apricots and peaches - soooooooooooo goooooooooood :love: (Didn't last long though!)


Hmmm. Maybe me and vic will need to make a trip up the island to the hawkes bay and get a couple of cases of fruit to bring back with us. I might be able to work myself into a preserving frenzy.

I remember growing up we would go on holidays to my aunt and uncles farm in the waikato (originally coromandel but then they shifted to just north of morrinsville). My aunt had 10 children and was a large-scale preserver. I recall the hallway (about 10m long) having floor-to-ceiling cupboards, all filled with preserved fruit and jams. It was then that I discovered the joys of kiwifruit jam and (my favourite at the time) grape jam.
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Postby sweet_P on Wed 10/Sep/08 1:13am

I've started making jam! Feijoa & apricot a few months back - and lemon marmalade just last week!

It's quite a cool feeling stacking up the jars in the cupboard, feeling all domestic :)
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