Re: Anyone Trained For A 12 Hour Race With Very Limited Time?

Postby Slapheid on Tue 22/Sep/15 8:38am

I did the Contact Epic last year with one 40km training ride on top of my normal commuting rides.
That didn't work out so good..... :huh:
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Re: Anyone Trained For A 12 Hour Race With Very Limited Time?

Postby Rik on Tue 22/Sep/15 9:14am

April is NOT a short period away, that is ages away. I've entered the McClean 12 hour solo that's a short period away away. So I guess We'll find out very soon if my advice holds any water or not.

I have kids so training has to get based around them.

a) You do need to get in a practice ride so like jimmi71 says to find your pace and how you keep fueled.
b) Turn commute into a training session, If its too short, go the long way around. If its too long, drive 1/2 bike the rest.
c) Get a turbo trainer, then you can get 20 mins in here and there, whilst the kids are seeing how postman Pat is doing on his round.

and the last one is contentious, but

d) This is a massive excuse/motivation to lose some weight. There's 43,200 seconds in 12 hours, any extra weight on you or the bike adds up quickly in the energy equation over that period.
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Re: Anyone Trained For A 12 Hour Race With Very Limited Time?

Postby Sims on Tue 22/Sep/15 9:28am

Slim wrote:Running will be your friend. I travel a fair bit for work so am short of time and equipment for riding so running is about as good as it gets some times. Couple of years ago I trained for a 100km event with running and a couple hours on the bike each week.


I've found the opposite - My running and cycling are like two independent silos. I'm a long term cyclist, but have only been running for the last few years. Lung capacity does seem to be shared between the two, but specific conditioning seems to be independent.

However, 6mths is a long way away! Thats plenty of time. I'd start with the discipline of doing something everyday. Doesn't matter what it is, or for how long. Once you've slipped into a routine you can push out some distance.

I tend to think of training in the real world with a bit of reductionist approach... Don't think big; Big changes are hard to cement, and daunting to keep up. Think small. Whats the one thing you know you'll be able to do everyday. Start the routine, and then build on whats actually achievable.

The two things that work for me are, cycling to work, (because i have to everyday), and running/mtbing with the missus (because its fun QT).
Last edited by Sims on Tue 22/Sep/15 9:59am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Anyone Trained For A 12 Hour Race With Very Limited Time?

Postby jo on Tue 22/Sep/15 9:46am

Scaredy_Cat wrote:Can't help on the limited time... but some good advice above :thumbsup: IMHO if you can get one 6 hour ride in somewhere, then you're good to go. Mainly to test food/drink and make sure everything is comfortable. Once you're riding, I find it helpful to break the race/ride down into blocks of 2-3 hours. 12 hours is a lot, but 2 hours? yeah, I can do that :)

:withstupid:
I'm with SC.
Remember that you dont have to ride continuously, at the race, or in training. Do an hour or so on the way to work, do an hour at lunch if you can manage it, intervals, then an hour on the way home.

And I second the comment on making it part of your commute - its the only way I can find the motivation sometimes.
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Re: Anyone Trained For A 12 Hour Race With Very Limited Time?

Postby noel_whiteside on Tue 22/Sep/15 1:45pm

A Turbo trainer is good if you've only got a few minutes here and there, but if you can get out on your mtb.
If I don't do enough time out on the mtb I get very sore arms/wrists/hands at these events. You can't simulate hours of riding over bumps and breaking before corners while on a trainer.
Riding a mtb in training is important. If you can improve your skills a little bit and save 30 seconds a lap by not slowing round corners, etc, it will add up to a lot by the end of 12 hours. Might even be enough so you can get out for one more lap.
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Re: Anyone Trained For A 12 Hour Race With Very Limited Time?

Postby Zoom on Tue 22/Sep/15 2:26pm

jo wrote:
Scaredy_Cat wrote:Can't help on the limited time... but some good advice above :thumbsup: IMHO if you can get one 6 hour ride in somewhere, then you're good to go. Mainly to test food/drink and make sure everything is comfortable. Once you're riding, I find it helpful to break the race/ride down into blocks of 2-3 hours. 12 hours is a lot, but 2 hours? yeah, I can do that :)

:withstupid:
I'm with SC.
Remember that you dont have to ride continuously, at the race, or in training. Do an hour or so on the way to work, do an hour at lunch if you can manage it, intervals, then an hour on the way home.

And I second the comment on making it part of your commute - its the only way I can find the motivation sometimes.


Agree with the above, my methodology is if I am ok for half the time I will be sweet. During the race your body will do what your mind allows, so convince yourself you are right for 12 hours, be sensible with food, drink and pace and you will fine!
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Re: Anyone Trained For A 12 Hour Race With Very Limited Time?

Postby danose on Tue 22/Sep/15 4:06pm

Slim wrote:Running will be your friend. I travel a fair bit for work so am short of time and equipment for riding so running is about as good as it gets some times. Couple of years ago I trained for a 100km event with running and a couple hours on the bike each week.


we know that secretly you actually ENJOY running ;)
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Re: Anyone Trained For A 12 Hour Race With Very Limited Time?

Postby UK_Exile on Tue 22/Sep/15 5:24pm

First the questions; 12hr compete or complete?
If its compete 6mths is a shortish time, regardless if flat or hills.
Flat’ish 12hr or hilly 12hr?
If its complete 6months is a long time away for hills & a very long time away if its flat.

Following comments are solely based on my expereince of completing two 6hr solos & one 12hr solo at Mcleans MTB.

I completed the two 6hrs purely on 8km flat cycle commutes 5 days per week & 3 or 4 2hr rides.
Did the 12hrs on same 10 x 8km per week, plus half dozen 3hr rides. No 9hrs rides, no wind trainer, no gym, no trainer or coach.
However the commutes were all done commuter racing on MTB trying to pass everyone, on MTB or roadie. For me that was enough. Regular small but fairly hard was plenty of training as the 6hr & particularly the 12hr event is just set an easy pace & stick at it. Job done!
Keep it simple. Ignore all the people streaming past. You’re not racing them. They are riding 30mins max then taking a rest. You’re riding constantly for 12hrs & that very different. Don’t ignore that fact.
After that it’s all mental strength, not physical that’ll get you through.
If you have reasonable fitness & I mean reasonable, not athletic, able to push yourself as hard as you can for say 1hr type fitness then that’s all you need. Don’t expect it to be easy, but then again it based on my experience, it will also be easier than you think it will be.
If you’re able to do something physical all day be it gardening, building, labouring etc then you can ride 12hrs if you have the right mental attitude. If you don’t relax and cruise it’s your mental side that will fail you & that’ll lead to physical fail.
Break the day in laps finishing that one then the next then the next. Or perhaps sets of 10km chunks. Whatever works for you.
Use a heart rate monitor or your own exertion expereicne to keep your pace steady & controlled. You should be able to easily talk freely at all time. That type level of exertion.
Keep calm. Ignore others. Don’t race them.
For me I set an alarm at 80% of max HR & if it beeped I’d allow myself a couple of minutes to get it back under 80%. That way I could push a little when wanted but still stay in an area I could stick at all day long. Over the whole day I think my average was about 75% of max.
Every approx. 30min lap I briefly stopped at tent, said hi & thank you as I received another ½ drink bottle and something small to eat. Had a variety of basic food everyday food. I had alternating bottles of water & sports drink with mueslei bars, bananas, gingernut biscuits, raspberry buns, potato chip sandwich, fish & chips (true! I was based at a work team & they had fish & chip at end of their 6hrs) and all important christmas fruit cake. You’ll likely crave salty savory after a while so don’t just have sweet stuff.
260km later it was all over, I was sore but happy & so was my support person as I’d been nice to them. Don’t ignore your supporters. You will fail if you fail them.
I completed the 6hrs & 12hr on short duration training then adjusting my pace on the day. Pperhaps could say I even partially competed as finished in top ¼ to 1/3 of field & age category but bear in mind McLeans is flat laps as only about 30m elevation gain each lap. Aged 43-45 when I did them.

My best guess is I’d had more spare time, the 2-3hrs you have & time for long rides most weekends I’d compete a bit more so finish maybe 15-45 mins further ahead & I’d be less sore the next couple of days. Don’t think I’d enjoy it any more though. If fact competing would probably be less enjoyable than completing.
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